“I Thought I Was Really Stupid”

A quote from a gifted adult looking back at elementary school, from Deborah Ruf’s fantastic article: > “I often thought that I was really stupid because I couldn’t understand why teachers taught things that I thought were obvious. I thought the other children were smarter because they saw complexities that I now know never existed. […]

Differentiate for Interesting

A reader wrote in to ask how to differentiate a lesson about reading analog clocks. What happens if a student has already mastered the task? This is a perfect example of a topic that doesn’t really have a “higher-level” version. Sure you could give more worksheets or harder times to read, but neither of those […]

Most Popular Puzzlements of March 2016

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Here are the most popular curiosities and puzzlements from March 2016: tumbleweed on a treadmill, a year of sunrises, tiny robots pulling a car, and more!

Creating Research Questions

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Last time I showed how to use the Wikipedia Wormhole to find interesting topics for research. Now we’ll look at how to form interesting questions to investigate those topics.

The Wikipedia Wormhole

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Use this tool to find interesting topics for independent studies that are still related to classroom material.

Preparation Makes Presentations

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Compare and contrast Steve Jobs’ iPhone announcement with Elon Musk’s Tesla Model 3 presentation to highlight the need for preparation when giving a talk.

Teaching Gifted Kids To Explain Their Thinking

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It’s a weird trap: because a child is “so smart”, everyone thinks any gaps in their skills are a result of laziness or defiance. But sometimes the brightest kid needs small group instruction for a skill the rest of the class already gets.